Dick Handshaw - Real Learning. Real Results.
Training that Delivers Results: Instructional Design that Aligns with Business Goals

Dick Handshaw’s new book is available for Amazon pre-order now.

 
 
 

Workshops

The workshops are divided into two categories: Learning and Performance Consulting. They vary in length from half, full, and multiple day formats, and are appropriate for small to medium audiences of 12 to 24 people to include coaching and feedback. The workshops can be delivered in person, via virtual web sessions with full video and audio, or by using a combination of the two. We will customize any of these workshops to meet your specific needs.

We offer the workshops for any type of organization, delivered on your site. Please go to the Contact page and submit the form or email katie.coombs@handshaw.com to receive additional information or discuss booking a workshop.

Full data sheets are available for each workshop. Download the PDF by clicking on a workshop topic to receive additional details about a specific workshop.

Training Workshops:

  1. Training That Delivers Results Series (5 days, limit 20)
  2. Learning Analysis?  You Can’t Afford Not To (1 day, limit 20)
  3. Learning Design: Using a Practical, Systems Approach (1 day, limit 20)
  4. Testing and Learner Validation - Making it Practical and Useful (1 day, limit 20)
  5. eLearning Starts with Instructional Design(1 day, limit 20)

Performance Consulting Workshops:

  1. Performance Consulting (1 day, limit 12)
  2. The Gaps Map (1 day, limit 12)
  3. Performance Consulting and Gaps Map (2 days, limit 12)
  4. Training Request? Ask Questions First (1/2 day, limit 12)

Training That Delivers Results Series

Training That Delivers Results is a comprehensive skill building workshop based on the book of the same name by Dick Handshaw. The workshop focuses on the Handshaw Instructional Design Model that combines performance consulting and instructional design to create a process that aligns with sustainable business results. The Series is offered and delivered as a team-building event with real-world exercises to encourage skill development. Learners will participate in role play exercises to hone their consulting skills. Participants will also practice using a process for developing a useful task analysis. By the end of the session, each participant will be able to write performance objectives that work and save time. Participants will also practice using a course prototype to help ensure learning programs work properly the first time by gathering data from the most important resource—the learners.

Specific concepts outlined in the workshop include:

  • Proactive and Reactive Performance Consulting
  • The Gaps Map
  • Instructional Design Process
  • Front-end Analysis
  • Performance Objectives
  • Criterion-referenced Testing
  • Measurement and Instructional Strategies
  • Media Selection
  • Formative Evaluation
  • Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Duration and Audience Size:

This workshop is ideal for all learning and human resource professionals who are responsible for performance improvement and designing learning solutions. By understanding and adopting Handshaw’s proven methodology, teams can improve overall effectiveness, especially in those instances where individuals must work outside of their content expertise. Our systematic approach is fully content-neutral, allowing it to be effective in any professional or academic environment.

Experienced professionals who participate will get value from the workshop as well as the job aids and reference tools contained in the student workbook. The workshop helps learning professionals focus on business results and remain effective over time.

The workshop is intended for a group of 10-20 participants and can be conducted at the client’s site, at Handshaw’s offices in Charlotte, NC, or any other suitable location. All workshop fees include:

  • 5 days of classroom instruction  
  • 6 hours of telephone coaching/support
  • All instructional materials

 Performance Objectives:

  1. Achieve measurable results by using the Handshaw Instructional Design Model for analysis, design, development, and evaluation
  2. Avoid costly rework by developing programs right the first time
  3. Practice proactive and reactive performance consulting skills
  4. Practice using a Gaps Map to identify learning and non-learning solutions to business problems.
  5. Develop a job task analysis that incorporates both procedural and cognitive analysis
  6. Write five part performance objectives that help prescribe measurement strategy
  7. Develop a measurement strategy based on a job task analysis and the action portion of your performance objectives
  8. Develop an instructional strategy based upon your previous analysis and design documents
  9. Select media for your instructional strategy based on a proven methodology and your performance objectives
  10. Use formative evaluation with actual learners to design learning that works every time.

Back to Top
—————————————————————————-

Learning Analysis?  You Can’t Afford Not To

“Analysis? We don’t have time for that. It’s too expensive. Truth is, I’m not really sure how to do it.” Sound familiar? Sure it does.

In this session, Dick Handshaw will show participants how learning analysis has reduced overall training costs for his clients over the past twenty eight years in business. Completing a task analysis may be tedious, but it is neither difficult nor expensive. Participants will complete a task analysis during the session and will learn how analysis benefits them in course design and development. Participants will also learn what to do with an audience analysis and a learning culture analysis.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Determine what level of analysis is needed given the situation, risk and the business case.
  2. Conduct a task analysis that is useful in course design and doesn’t take too long or cost too much.
  3. Conduct an appropriate audience and learning culture analysis that serves a useful purpose in learning design and development.

Back to Top

—————————————————————————-

Learning Design: Using a Practical, Systems Approach

Many opinions have been shared about the value of instructional design over the past twenty years. Some say it is obsolete and outdated. Some say you can’t even think about designing learning solutions without it. Dick Handshaw believes both schools of thought are right. Dick says, “It’s not really instructional design that’s outdated, it’s the way people are using it that’s outdated.”

In this session, participants will learn how to apply instructional design principles to real-life learning design opportunities in a way that focuses on results, and also saves time and money. Participants will be able to develop performance objectives and write them with ease by the end of the session. Dick will help participants understand why they should design the measurement strategy before they design the instructional strategy. Participants will also begin using a systematic way to select delivery systems for blended learning solutions.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Write performance objectives that actually define criteria to measure against.
  2. Use design of measurement instruments as a way to improve learning design.
  3. Make intelligent decisions about delivery systems that take into account learning culture and business issues.

Back to Top
—————————————————————————-

Testing and Learner Validation - Making it Practical and Useful 

Test construction is one of the most misunderstood skills in our profession. There are only two mistakes we make in developing tests. One is selecting the wrong type of testing instrument and the other is poor construction of test questions. The testing portion of this workshop includes a hands-on skill building exercise for selecting testing instruments and writing better test questions. This workshop also includes two useful job aids. With a little practice, we can almost guarantee that participants will be developing tests that are valid and reliable.

In the Learner Validation portion of the workshop participants will learn how to plan for, conduct, and evaluate a Learner Tryout and a Field Test. We will conduct a Learner Tryout during the session with a sample of an eLearning course. Based on the feedback from a sample learner, we will identify areas for revision or for further testing. Participants will discover that for the amount of time spent, Formative Evaluation can become a valuable and cost effective design tool.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Identify the correct testing instrument based on the performance objective and required level of learned capability.
  2. Apply Handshaw’s “Principles of Test Construction” to be able to write better test questions that are both valid and reliable.
  3. Prepare for, conduct and analyze the results for a Learner Tryout.
  4. Prepare for, conduct and analyze the results for a Field Test.

Back to Top

—————————————————————————-

eLearning Starts with Instructional Design 

As someone who created his first eLearning program in 1980, Dick Handshaw knows that nothing did more for the advancement of instructional design than the widespread adoption of eLearning. There is a reason for that. It is very expensive to just start creating an eLearning program without at least some planning ahead of time. Dick’s operation of his eLearning business for 28 years has taught him that the appropriate application of instructional design saves time and money and improves the quality of the outcome.

The first half of this workshop will give participants some hands-on practice at developing a task analysis and writing performance objectives. In the second half, participants will use their work from the morning to develop measurement and instructional strategies for eLearning solutions. During the last hour, attendees will have a special opportunity to participate in a virtual session with Handshaw’s senior designers, who create eLearning every day. They will share examples of successful eLearning strategies along with technical tips and advice on tools.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Develop an efficient and useful task analysis to describe the learner outcomes.
  2. Write useful performance objectives to describe the level of measurement required to predict learner performance on the job.
  3. Select a measurement and instructional strategy that will work in an eLearning course.
  4. Select some tools and techniques that will support the development of measurement and instructional strategies that will require learner input and provide meaningful practice and feedback.

Back to Top

—————————————————————————-

Performance Consulting Workshop

In many companies and organizations it is no longer acceptable for learning and organizational development professionals to conduct business as order takers.  Internal consultants are expected to practice performance consulting with their clients in order to achieve measurable returns on the investments made in organizational initiatives.  Performance Consulting is focused on enhancing the skills of internal consultants to support the goal of establishing strong proactive partnerships with their clients.

The morning session of the workshop introduces proactive performance consultgin. Participants learn and practice the skills required to develop the consultative partner relationship with key clients and leaders in the organization. This can be a difficult challenge for some organizations. Through positive examples, role plays and feedback, participants will develop the skill and confidence to initiate the process.

The afternoon session focuses on re-framing. Participants will learn how to handle inappropriate client requests in a way that yields better results for the consultant and the client. Participants will develop skills using a re-framing exercise that allows them to play the role of the consultant and client during practice.

The results are effective since real-world project examples are used for the role-play scenarios. This workshop allows participants to discover their own abilities as a performance partner and equips them to develop the confidence to use them.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Engage clients in discussions about business goals and barriers to performance for current and future project opportunities.
  2. Engage the client in an open discussion about business needs and the performance required to support them.
  3. Practice and improve eight skills that will facilitate the proactive interview.
  4. Practice and improve eight skills that will facilitate the re-framing discussion.
  5. Identify opportunities to conduct further analysis of the performance needs in order to identify learning needs.

Back to Top
—————————————————————————-

The Gaps Map Workshop

This workshop is focused on Gaps Map skill building. Identifying Gaps Logic is a skill Jim and Dana Robinson taught during their distinguished careers. Their books on performance consulting are still widely read and considered the blueprint for applying Gaps Logic in a business setting. During this session the participants will view positive video examples and unacceptable video examples of how to conduct an interview and begin completing a Gaps Map. The key takeaway from this session is asking the correct “Should, Is, Cause” questions in order to obtain performance relationship data and complete the Gaps Map.

Participants will practice this skill during the workshop through realistic scenarios and receive feedback on their performance.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Apply the “Needs Hierarchy” to categorize performance needs in an organization.
  2. Use known information about a performance gap to begin a Gaps Map in preparation for a client interview.
  3. Ask “Should, Is, Cause” questions in a client interview to work toward completion of a Gaps Map.
  4. Identify both learning and non-learning causes that will lead to the development of an integrated performance solution.

Back to Top

—————————————————————————-

Performance Consulting and Gaps Map Workshop

In many companies and organizations it is no longer acceptable for learning and organizational development professionals to conduct business as order takers.  Internal consultants are expected to practice performance consulting with their clients in order to achieve measurable returns on the investments made in organizational initiatives.  Performance Consulting is focused on enhancing the skills of internal consultants to support the goal of establishing strong, proactive partnerships with their clients.

The morning session of day one of the workshop introduces proactive performance consulting. Participants learn and practice the skills required to develop the consultative partner relationship with key clients and leaders in the organization. This can be a difficult challenge for some organizations. Through positive examples, role plays and feedback, participants will develop the skill and confidence to initiate the process.

The afternoon session of day one focuses on re-framing. Participants will learn how to handle inappropriate client requests in a way that yields better results for the consultant and the client. Participants will develop skills using a re-framing exercise that allows them to play the role of the consultant and client during practice.  The results are effective since real world project examples are used for the role-play scenarios. This workshop allows participants to discover their own abilities as a performance partner and equips them to develop the confidence to use them.

The second day of the workshop is focused on Gaps Map skill building. Identifying Gaps Logic is a skill Jim and Dana Robinson taught during their distinguished careers. Their books on performance consulting are still widely read and considered the blueprint for applying Gaps Logic in a business setting. During this session the participants will view positive video examples and unacceptable video examples of how to conduct an interview and begin completing a Gaps Map. The key takeaway from this session is asking the correct “Should, Is, Cause” questions in order to obtain performance relationship data and complete the Gaps Map.  Participants will practice this skill during the workshop through realistic scenarios and receive feedback on their performance.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Engage clients in discussions about business goals and barriers to performance for current and future project opportunities.
  2. Engage the client in an open discussion about business needs and the performance required to support them.
  3. Practice and improve eight skills that will facilitate the proactive interview.
  4. Practice and improve eight skills that will facilitate the re-framing discussion.
  5. Identify opportunities to conduct further analysis of the performance needs in order to identify learning needs.
  6. Apply the “Needs Hierarchy” to categorize performance needs in an organization.
  7. Use known information about a performance gap to begin a Gaps Map in preparation for a client interview.
  8. Ask “Should, Is, Cause” questions in a client interview to work toward completion of a Gaps Map.
  9. Identify both learning and non-learning causes that will lead to the development of an integrated performance solution.

Back to Top

—————————————————————————-

Training Request?  Ask Questions First

This workshop is focused on re-framing skill building and is a major component of our Performance Consulting Workshop. In this workshop, participants will learn how to handle inappropriate training requests in a way that yields better results for the participant and the client. Participants will develop skills using a re-framing exercise that allows them to play the role of both the consultant and client during the practice. The results are effective since real world project examples are used for the role-play scenarios. This workshop allows participants to discover their own abilities as a performance partner and equips them to develop the confidence to use them.

Performance Objectives:

  1. Engage the client in an open discussion about business needs and the performance required to support them.
  2. Practice and improve eight skills that will facilitate the re-framing interview.
  3. Identify opportunities to conduct further analysis of the performance needs in order to identify learning needs.

Back to Top

—————————————————————————-


blog comments powered by Disqus
| 1 OF 1 |
 
704.731.5314 | dick.handshaw@handshaw.com |  © 2014 Dick Handshaw.